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SPH Writing Support Services

Getting started with SPH Writing Support Services

Succeeding in Graduate School

These resources will help you succeed in graduate school:

Managing your time is critical for success in graduate school; these resources are designed to help you manage your time:

Reading lots, lots, and lots of scholarly literature is required in graduate school; these resources (videos) are designed to show you how to read faster:

Stinky Academic Writing and How to Fix It

The Chronicle of Higher Education has reprinted Steven Pinker's manifesto, "Why Academics' Writing Stinks," along with advice from four experts on how to fix it, in a booklet.

A PDF version of this booklet is provided below:

Logical Fallacies & Cognitive Biases

1. According to the Thou Shalt Not Commit Logical Fallacies website, "A logical fallacy is a flaw in reasoning. Logical fallacies are like tricks or illusions of thought, and they're often very sneakily used by politicians and the media to fool people." This website presents various logical fallacies.

A PDF version of a logical fallacies poster is provided below:

2. Cognitive biases are flaws in our thinking or judgment that arise from errors of memory, social attribution, and miscalculations. The Royal Society of Account Planning has produced a visual study guide to help you memorize all the cognitive biases. 

A PDF version of the visual study guide is provided below, as well as PDF versions of other lists of cognitive biases:

Bottom Line Up Front (BLUF) Writing Style

BLUF (Bottom Line Up Front) is a writing strategy used extensively across the U.S. military for efficient communication.

Nature: The Future of Publishing

In a March 2013 special issue, Nature took "a close look at the forces now at work in scientific publishing, and how they may play out over the coming decades."

"Predatory" Publishers Are Ruining Science